1 Brilliant Maranatha Poem | “Come Lord Jesus” | Second Coming of Christ

Maranatha: The King Returns” is a stirring poetic reflection on the anticipated Second Coming of Jesus Christ to earth. This poem envisions this profound and awe-inspiring event, when Jesus, our Lord and Savior, returns to earth in unparalleled glory and splendor, fulfilling the ancient promise of His return. His arrival will signify the establishment of His eternal kingdom, the final judgment of all humanity, and the reward of the faithful who believe that He is the way, truth, and life.

In this poetic narrative, Jesus is portrayed not only as the compassionate Redeemer but also as the righteous King and Judge. The poem vividly describes the awe-inspiring scene of Christ’s descent from heaven, clothed in majesty and power, heralded by the sound of trumpets and the acclamation of all creation. This event will mark the climax of history and the ultimate fulfillment of God’s redemptive plan for humanity.

The poem vividly portrays the future moment when Christ will descend from heaven, resplendent in power and authority. It is understood that upon His return, Jesus will establish His everlasting kingdom, a realm characterized by justice, peace, and righteousness. The imagery of His arrival evokes a sense of awe and reverence, reflecting the profound impact of this event on the entire cosmos.

Central to the poem is the theme of Godly justice. Upon His return, Jesus will judge the living and the dead, differentiating between those who have accepted His grace and those who have rejected it. His enemies, who have stood against His truth and justice, will face the consequences of their actions and get their rightful judgment. In contrast, the faithful—those who have persevered in their faith and deeds—will receive their reward, highlighting the themes of fairness, mercy, and the triumph of righteousness.

“Maranatha: The King Returns” is both a plea for Christ’s return and a declaration of hope and faith. It calls for believers to live in anticipation and readiness for the coming of their King. The poem resonates with the assurance that, despite current trials and tribulations (darkness and suffering), the return of Christ will bring about ultimate justice, harmony, and eternal joy, culminating in the restoration of all creation.

Maranatha Definition (Maranatha Meaning)

maranatha definition, maranatha, 
maranatha meaning, maranatha music, maranatha songs

Maranatha is an Aramaic expression that appears in the New Testament, specifically in 1 Corinthians 16:22, which means “Our Lord, come” or “Come, O Lord.” This term reflects an ardent yearning for the return of Jesus Christ, a key aspect of Christian eschatology. It encapsulates the hope and anticipation of believers for the Second Coming of Christ, where He will return in glory to judge those who are alive and those who are dead, establish His eternal kingdom, and bring about eventual redemption and tranquility.

The word “Maranatha” is often used in Christian liturgy and prayers, symbolizing both an appeal for Christ’s impending return and a profession of belief in His prospective coming. Its invocation carries a profound theological significance, expressing trust in God’s promise and a longing for the fulfillment of divine equity and virtue.

Biblical references associated with the concept of “Maranatha” include:

  • Revelation 22:20: “He who testifies to these things says, ‘Surely I am coming soon.’ Amen. Come, Lord Jesus!”
  • Philippians 3:20: “But our citizenship is in heaven, and from it we await a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ.”
  • 1 Corinthians 16:22: “If anyone does not love the Lord, let him be accursed. Maranatha.”

Thus, “Maranatha” serves as a powerful reminder of the Christian hope and expectation for Jesus’ glorious return and the establishment of His everlasting kingdom.

Maranatha: The King Returns Poem

maranatha definition, maranatha, 
maranatha meaning, maranatha music, maranatha songs

In the quiet of the night, when stars whisper bright,
A promise resounds through the ages’ long flight.
A Savior returning, in glory and might,
To reign as the King in the fullness of light.

Maranatha, the cry from the depths of our soul,
Maranatha, the plea for a world made whole.
For the earth groans in pain, shadows pressing tight,
Awaiting the dawn of the eternal light.

Maranatha, they cry, the faithful and true,
Maranatha, as the old fades and the new comes through.
The world in its turmoil, longing for peace,
Awaits the Redeemer, the end of all fight.

Maranatha, the song of ages to come,
Maranatha, the sound of heaven’s drum.
For the One who was, and is, and will be,
Returns in glory, setting captives free.

The proud will be humbled, their power laid low,
Before the righteous Judge, whose judgments will show.
The meek and the mourning, the pure and the kind,
Will rise in His kingdom, His heart intertwined.

Maranatha, He comes, in justice and grace,
Maranatha, the King, with love on His face.
He shall judge, He shall rule, with scepter and rod,
And the wounds of His love still mark the Lamb of God.

The enemies of love, who spurned His call,
Will face His justice, in awe will fall.
But the faithful who believed, who followed His ways,
Will shine like the stars in His glorious blaze.

The nations will gather, both great and small,
Before the Lamb, the Judge of all.
Books will be opened, each life laid bare,
Yet mercy will triumph for those in His care.

O hearts, be prepared, for the day draws near,
When skies will blaze with His presence clear.
Let faith be your anchor, and love your guide,
For the King is coming, with arms open wide.

Maranatha, the King, in radiant array,
Maranatha, the Judge, at the dawn of day.
The Alpha, Omega, Beginning and End,
Our Savior, our Lord, our eternal Friend.

He shall come, robed in majesty, eyes like the flame,
With a voice like thunder, declaring His name.
The heavens will part with a trumpet’s loud sound,
And every knee will bow as His glory is found.

Every tear wiped away by His gentle hand,
In the radiance of His presence, we’ll understand.
The sorrows and trials, the suffering past,
Fade in His glory, His peace unsurpassed.

Maranatha, the King, in beauty and peace,
Maranatha, His reign brings ultimate release.
No more suffering, no more pain,
In the presence of Jesus, forever we’ll remain.

The angels will sing, a chorus so grand,
As the redeemed join the heavenly band.
Worthy is the Lamb, who conquered the grave,
To Him be the glory, for the love that He gave.

Maranatha, the call, echoing through time,
Maranatha, fulfilled in vision sublime.
The bride is now ready, adorned in pure white,
For the wedding feast in the halls of light.

The King on His throne, with His people to dwell,
In a world redeemed from the grip of hell.
A new heaven, a new earth, where righteousness reigns,
Where the curse is lifted, and life never wanes.

His kingdom will flourish, like gardens in bloom,
With leaves for healing, dispelling all gloom.
No darkness, no night, in this city so fair,
For the Lamb is the light, His glory everywhere.

So lift your heads, all you gates of earth,
For the King of Glory comes in His worth.
Let the earth tremble, let the skies sing,
Maranatha, our God, our King.

Analysis of Maranatha: The King Returns Poem

maranatha definition, maranatha, 
maranatha meaning, maranatha music, maranatha songs

Stanza 1: “In the quiet of the night, when stars whisper bright, A promise resounds through the ages’ long flight. A Savior returning, in glory and might, To reign as the King in the fullness of light.”

Analysis: This stanza sets a serene and expectant tone, evoking the calmness of night and the twinkling of stars as a backdrop to the ancient promise of Christ’s return. The “stars whisper bright” evokes a sense of quiet anticipation. The “promise” refers to the long-awaited return of the Savior, a theme deeply rooted in Christian theology. The Savior’s return is depicted with grandeur and authority, highlighting His “glory and might” and His future reign in “the fullness of light,” which symbolizes ultimate truth and righteousness.

The Bible references include:

  • Luke 21:27: “Then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory.”
  • Revelation 22:5: “And night will be no more. They will need no light of lamp or sun, for the Lord God will be their light, and they will reign forever and ever.”

Stanza 2: “Maranatha, the cry from the depths of our soul, Maranatha, the plea for a world made whole. For the earth groans in pain, shadows pressing tight, Awaiting the dawn of the eternal light.”

Analysis: “Maranatha” is an Aramaic expression meaning “Come, Lord.” This stanza captures humanity’s deep yearning for Christ’s return, a plea for redemption and restoration. The phrase “the earth groans in pain” personifies the planet, suggesting widespread suffering, brokenness, and darkness, longing for the deliverance that Christ’s return will bring. The “shadows pressing tight” symbolize the encroaching evil and hardships. The stanza culminates in a hopeful expectation of the “eternal light,” signifying the coming of divine intervention and salvation.

The Bible references include:

  • Romans 8:22: “For we know that the whole creation has been groaning together in the pains of childbirth until now.”
  • Revelation 21:4: “He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”

Stanza 3: “Maranatha, they cry, the faithful and true, Maranatha, as the old fades and the new comes through. The world in its turmoil, longing for peace, Awaits the Redeemer, the end of all fight.”

Analysis: The repeated cry of “Maranatha” underscores the earnest anticipation of believers for Christ’s return. This stanza contrasts the old world, marked by turmoil, with the new era of peace ushered in by the Redeemer. It emphasizes the universal desire for an end to conflict and the establishment of lasting peace. The old fading and the new emerging reflect the influential impact of Christ’s return, bringing peace to a world in turmoil.

The Bible references include:

  • 2 Peter 3:13: “But according to his promise we are waiting for new heavens and a new earth in which righteousness dwells.”
  • Isaiah 9:6: “For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.”

Stanza 4: “Maranatha, the song of ages to come, Maranatha, the sound of heaven’s drum. For the One who was, and is, and will be, Returns in glory, setting captives free.”

Analysis: This stanza captures the timeless and universal anticipation of Christ’s return. “Maranatha,” repeated as a “song of ages,” underscores the enduring hope for divine intervention. The “sound of heaven’s drum” symbolizes this moment’s grand and inevitable arrival. Christ is described as “the One who was, and is, and will be,” emphasizing His eternal and unchanging nature. His return “in glory” signifies a majestic and triumphant event, bringing liberation (“setting captives free”) to those bound by sin and suffering, fulfilling the ultimate promise of redemption and freedom.

These lines emphasize the eternal nature of Christ and His mission to liberate humanity, fulfilling the hope of the ages.

The Bible references include:

  • Revelation 1:8: “I am the Alpha and the Omega,” says the Lord God, “who is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty.”
  • Luke 4:18: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed.”

Stanza 5: “The proud will be humbled, their power laid low, Before the righteous Judge, whose judgments will show. The meek and the mourning, the pure and the kind, Will rise in His kingdom, His heart intertwined.”

Analysis: This stanza speaks to the impartial justice of the Savior. The proud being humbled and the meek rising reflect Jesus’ teachings about the last being first. It demonstrates a reversal of earthly hierarchies and highlights the theme of heavenly justice. The “Righteous Judge” implies fair and just judgment. The meek, mourning, pure, and kind being uplifted signifies the values of the new kingdom, where those who suffered and remained virtuous are rewarded and intimately connected with the Savior.

The Bible references include:

  • Matthew 5:5: “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.”
  • James 4:6: “But he gives more grace. Therefore it says, ‘God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.'”

Stanza 6: “Maranatha, He comes, in justice and grace, Maranatha, the King, with love on His face. He shall judge, He shall rule, with scepter and rod, And the wounds of His love still mark the Lamb of God.”

Analysis: This stanza juxtaposes justice and grace, reflecting the dual aspects of the Savior’s return. The King’s rule is marked by love and the symbols of justice (scepter and rod). The mention of the “wounds of His love” refers to Christ’s crucifixion, underscoring the sacrificial love that defines His identity as the “Lamb of God.”

The Bible references include:

  • John 5:22: “For the Father judges no one, but has given all judgment to the Son.”
  • Revelation 5:6: “And between the throne and the four living creatures and among the elders I saw a Lamb standing, as though it had been slain, with seven horns and with seven eyes, which are the seven spirits of God sent out into all the earth.”

Stanza 7: “The enemies of love, who spurned His call, Will face His justice, in awe will fall. But the faithful who believed, who followed His ways, Will shine like the stars in His glorious blaze.”

Analysis: This stanza emphasizes the final judgment, where the faithful are rewarded and those who reject Christ face justice. It highlights the fate of those who rejected the Savior (“enemies of love”) facing divine justice, contrasting with the fate of the faithful, who will be glorified (“shine like the stars”). This reinforces the theme of ultimate accountability and reward.

The Bible references include:

  • Daniel 12:3: “And those who are wise shall shine like the brightness of the sky above; and those who turn many to righteousness, like the stars forever and ever.”
  • 2 Thessalonians 1:8: “In flaming fire, inflicting vengeance on those who do not know God and on those who do not obey the gospel of our Lord Jesus.”

Stanza 8: “The nations will gather, both great and small, Before the Lamb, the Judge of all. Books will be opened, each life laid bare, Yet mercy will triumph for those in His care.”

Analysis: The universal judgment before Christ, with books recording every deed yet highlighting the triumph of mercy, is once again mentioned. It envisions a scene where all humanity stands before Christ. The “Books will be opened” suggests a detailed and fair assessment of each life. Despite this scrutiny, the stanza assures that mercy will prevail for those under His care, emphasizing the Savior’s benevolent nature.

The Bible references include:

  • Revelation 20:12: “And I saw the dead, great and small, standing before the throne, and books were opened. Then another book was opened, which is the book of life. And the dead were judged by what was written in the books, according to what they had done.”
  • James 2:13: “For judgment is without mercy to one who has shown no mercy. Mercy triumphs over judgment.”

Stanza 9: “O hearts, be prepared, for the day draws near, When skies will blaze with His presence clear. Let faith be your anchor, and love your guide, For the King is coming, with arms open wide.”

Analysis: This stanza serves as a call to readiness and faithfulness, urging believers to stay anchored in faith and guided by love as they await the imminent return of the King, depicted as welcoming and compassionate.

It urges believers to prepare for Jesus’ inevitable return, depicted as a climatic and unmistakable event (“skies will blaze with His presence”). Faith is described as an anchor, providing stability amidst anticipation, while love guides actions. The imagery of the King arriving “with arms open wide” portrays an affectionate, empathetic Christ, emphasizing both His nobility and His embrace of the faithful.

The Bible references include:

  • 1 Thessalonians 5:2: “For you yourselves are fully aware that the day of the Lord will come like a thief in the night.”
  • Hebrews 10:23: “Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful.”

Stanza 10: “Maranatha, the King, in radiant array, Maranatha, the Judge, at the dawn of day. The Alpha, Omega, Beginning and End, Our Savior, our Lord, our eternal Friend.”

Analysis: This stanza highlights the multifaceted nature and roles of Christ: King, Judge, and eternal Friend. The titles “Alpha, Omega” underscore His eternal nature and omnipotence.

“Maranatha” is a call for His return, portraying Him as both King in “radiant array” and Judge at “the dawn of day,” signifying His authority and forthcoming judgment. Describing Christ as the “Alpha, Omega” underscores His everlasting presence and sovereignty over all time. As “Savior, Lord, and eternal Friend,” it highlights His relationship with believers, combining magnificence with intimacy.

The Bible references include:

  • Revelation 22:13: “I am the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end.”
  • John 15:15: “No longer do I call you servants, for the servant does not know what his master is doing; but I have called you friends, for all that I have heard from my Father I have made known to you.”

Stanza 11: “He shall come, robed in majesty, eyes like the flame, With a voice like thunder, declaring His name. The heavens will part with a trumpet’s loud sound, And every knee will bow as His glory is found.”

Analysis: This stanza describes the dramatic and awe-inspiring second coming of Christ, marked by powerful imagery such as a booming voice and a loud trumpet. The imagery of being “robed in majesty” and having “eyes like the flame” emphasizes his divine authority and omniscience. The “voice like thunder” signifies power and command. The parting of the heavens and the trumpet sound are traditional apocalyptic symbols indicating a world-changing event. The universal submission (“every knee will bow”) underscores the recognition of His supreme authority.

The Bible references include:

  • Revelation 1:14-15: “The hairs of his head were white, like white wool, like snow. His eyes were like a flame of fire, his feet were like burnished bronze, refined in a furnace, and his voice was like the roar of many waters.”
  • Philippians 2:10-11: “So that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.”

Stanza 12: “Every tear wiped away by His gentle hand, In the radiance of His presence, we’ll understand. The sorrows and trials, the suffering past, Fade in His glory, His peace unsurpassed.”

Analysis: This stanza offers consolation and reassurance, speaking to the comforting presence of Christ, who will heal and restore all suffering (“every tear wiped away”). The “radiance of His presence” suggests enlightenment and comprehension of past sufferings. The imagery of sorrows and trials fading in His glory emphasizes the transformative and all-encompassing peace that His presence brings. The promise of understanding and peace is deeply rooted in the Christian hope of eternal life with God.

The Bible references include:

  • Revelation 21:4: “He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”
  • 1 Corinthians 13:12: “For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I have been fully known.”

Stanza 13: “Maranatha, the King, in beauty and peace, Maranatha, His reign brings ultimate release. No more suffering, no more pain, In the presence of Jesus, forever we’ll remain.”

Analysis: This stanza celebrates the peace and beauty of Christ’s eternal reign, where suffering and pain cease. The perpetual presence of Jesus signifies eternal security and joy for believers.

The repeated cry of “Maranatha” emphasizes the deep yearning for Christ’s reign, which promises ultimate tranquility and joy. The phrase “forever we’ll remain” underscores the promise of perpetual communion with Jesus, portraying an unending state of divine peace and comfort, fulfilling the deepest hopes of the faithful.

The Bible references include:

  • Revelation 21:4: “He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”
  • Psalm 16:11: “You make known to me the path of life; in your presence there is fullness of joy; at your right hand are pleasures forevermore.”

Stanza 14: “The angels will sing, a chorus so grand, As the redeemed join the heavenly band. Worthy is the Lamb, who conquered the grave, To Him be the glory, for the love that He gave.”

Analysis: This stanza envisions a celestial celebration where angels and the redeemed together sing praises to Yeshua (Jesus’ Hebrew name). The focus on the Lamb’s victory over death and the love He demonstrated highlights the central Christian tenet of redemption through Christ’s sacrifice.

The Bible references include:

  • Revelation 5:12: “Saying with a loud voice, ‘Worthy is the Lamb who was slain, to receive power and wealth and wisdom and might and honor and glory and blessing!'”
  • Revelation 7:9-10: “After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice, ‘Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!'”

Stanza 15: “Maranatha, the call, echoing through time, Maranatha, fulfilled in vision sublime. The bride is now ready, adorned in pure white, For the wedding feast in the halls of light.”

Analysis: This stanza reflects the church, the bride of Christ, ready for the wedding feast, symbolizing the amalgamation with Christ. It ties the poem back to the central theme of longing for the Savior’s return. The image of the bride (representing the Church) “adorned in pure white” showcases purity and readiness for the banquet that symbolizes the culmination of history in a joyous union with Christ.

The Bible references include:

  • Revelation 19:7-8: “Let us rejoice and exult and give him the glory, for the marriage of the Lamb has come, and his Bride has made herself ready; it was granted her to clothe herself with fine linen, bright and pure.”
  • Matthew 25:10: “And while they were going to buy, the bridegroom came, and those who were ready went in with him to the marriage feast, and the door was shut.”

Stanza 16: “The King on His throne, with His people to dwell, In a world redeemed from the grip of hell. A new heaven, a new earth, where righteousness reigns, Where the curse is lifted, and life never wanes.”

Analysis: This stanza speaks of the redeemed world where Christ reigns with His people, free from the curse of sin and hell. It envisions the ultimate fulfillment of Christian eschatological hopes: a new heaven, a new earth, free from evil and suffering, where righteousness prevails and life never ends. The imagery of a new heaven and earth signifies complete renewal and perpetuity timelessness.

The Bible references include:

  • Revelation 21:1-3: “Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.”
  • Revelation 22:3: “No longer will there be anything accursed, but the throne of God and of the Lamb will be in it, and his servants will worship him.”

Stanza 17: “His kingdom will flourish, like gardens in bloom, With leaves for healing, dispelling all gloom. No darkness, no night, in this city so fair, For the Lamb is the light, His glory everywhere.”

Analysis: This stanza describes the flourishing and healing nature of Christ’s kingdom, where there is no darkness but only His light. The kingdom is a place of never-ending growth and well-being, symbolized by blooming gardens. The absence of darkness and night, with the Lamb as the eternal light, signifies a state of unending joy and enlightenment.

The Bible references include:

  • Revelation 22:2: “Through the middle of the street of the city; also, on either side of the river, the tree of life with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations.”
  • Revelation 21:23: “And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God gives it light, and its lamp is the Lamb.”

Stanza 18: “So lift your heads, all you gates of earth, For the King of Glory comes in His worth. Let the earth tremble, let the skies sing, Maranatha, our God, our King.”

Analysis: The final stanza calls for a universal acknowledgment and celebration of the Savior’s return, urging all creation to rejoice. The imagery of gates lifting, the earth trembling, and the skies singing creates a powerful, triumphant conclusion to the poem, encapsulating the anticipation and joy of Christ’s return.

The command to “lift your heads” suggests readiness and honor. The “King of Glory” arriving in His worth indicates His unparalleled royalty and virtue. The earth trembling and the skies singing reflect the profound impact of His return, with “Maranatha” reinforcing the plea and happiness for the divine presence. It emphasizes the transformative and awe-inspiring nature of Christ’s second coming.

The Bible references include:

  • Psalm 24:7-10: “Lift up your heads, O gates! And be lifted up, O ancient doors, that the King of glory may come in. Who is this King of glory? The Lord, strong and mighty, the Lord, mighty in battle!”
  • Isaiah 44:23: “Sing, O heavens, for the Lord has done it; shout, O depths of the earth; break forth into singing, O mountains, O forest, and every tree in it! For the Lord has redeemed Jacob, and will be glorified in Israel.”

Conclusion – Maranatha: The King Returns Poem

“Maranatha: The King Returns” culminates in a vision of hope and fulfillment, encapsulating the profound impact of Jesus Christ’s Second Coming. As the poem unfolds, it describes the majestic return of Jesus, the Good Samaritan, descending in glory to establish His eternal kingdom. This moment, steeped in divine splendor, signals the fulfillment of a historical promise and the pinnacle of God’s saving scheme.

The return of Christ is depicted as a life-altering event where He assumes His role as the righteous Monarch and Judge. The imagery of His arrival, with its celestial grandeur, underscores the magnitude of this divine intervention. Christ’s return brings about the ultimate establishment of His kingdom—a realm characterized by integrity, amity, and uprightness, where the loyal will dwell in eternal harmony.

The poem emphasizes the theme of judgment, a pivotal aspect of the Second Coming. Jesus will judge all humanity, both the living and dead, discerning the hearts and deeds of every individual. His enemies, those who have opposed His truth and love, will face the consequences of their defiance. Conversely, the faithful, who have steadfastly upheld their faith and righteousness, will be rewarded. This divine judgment highlights the ultimate triumph of good over evil and the assured victory of justice and mercy.

In its conclusion, “Maranatha: The King Returns” resonates with a call to preparedness and steadfast belief. It serves as a reminder to believers to live in anticipation of Christ’s return, maintaining hope and confidence amidst present trials. The poem encapsulates the promise that, despite the current suffering and darkness, the return of Jesus will bring about a new age of eternal goodwill, equity, and happiness.

Thus, “Maranatha: The King Returns” stands as a powerful declaration of conviction, optimism, and the effectual power of Christ’s Second Coming, urging believers to remain vigilant and faithful as they await the glorious return of their King.

Our eclectic collection of Christian poems contains life-changing Christian teachings, themes, and references. Christian poems are a subtle way to express our thanks to God for His wonderful grace, His wonderful creation, and His beloved Son. When you read these Christian poems, thank our Almighty God for working in your life, setting you free, and helping you become more aware of His presence in your life.

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